Football pitches in: Leeds

  • Ball
    BLENHEIM PRIMARY SCHOOL
    LOFTHOUSE PLACE, LEEDS, LS2 9EX (0.4 miles)
    Grass pitches: 1No artificial pitchesNo floodlit pitchesNo changing roomsParking availableNo public bookings available
    More info
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    POWERLEAGUE (LEEDS CENTRAL)
    Wellington Bridge Street, Leeds, LS3 1LW (0.6 miles)
    No grass pitchesArtificial pitches: 6Floodlit pitches: 6Changing roomsParking availablePublic booking available
    More info
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    ENFIELD- LEEDS CITY COLLEGE
    ENFIELD TERRACE, LEEDS, LS7 1RG (1.0 miles)
    No grass pitchesArtificial pitches: 1Floodlit pitches: 1Changing roomsParking availablePublic booking available
    More info
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    NORMA HUTCHINSON PARK
    38 SAVILE DRIVE, LEEDS, LS7 3ET (1.0 miles)
    Grass pitches: 1No artificial pitchesNo floodlit pitchesNo changing roomsNo parking availablePublic booking available
    More info
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    THE CO-OPERATIVE ACADEMY OF LEEDS
    Stoney Rock Lane, Leeds, LS9 7HD (1.2 miles)
    Grass pitches: 1Artificial pitches: 1No floodlit pitchesChanging roomsParking availablePublic booking available
    More info
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    ELLERBY LANE
    50 SPRING CLOSE GARDENS, LEEDS, LS9 8RS (1.2 miles)
    Grass pitches: 1No artificial pitchesNo floodlit pitchesNo changing roomsNo parking availablePublic booking available
    More info

About Leeds

Situated on the banks of the River Aire and shaped as a major economic centre during the Industrial Revolution, Leeds is the largest city in Yorkshire.
Leeds was initially known as a rugby town, a sport with which it remains associated today. In football, it’s considered to be the country’s largest one-club city.

Its footballing history got off to a shaky start when its first club, Leeds City, founded in 1904, was dissolved following ‘financial irregularities’ soon after the First World War. Leeds United was founded shortly afterwards and quickly entered the Football League.

Its home is Elland Road, the second largest stadium outside the Premier League, with a capacity of 37,697 people. It was a host stadium during the 1996 European World Championship, and was once described by Sir Alex Ferguson as “the most intimidating venue in Europe”.

In addition to well over a hundred amateur football pitches, Leeds’ other main sporting venues include the Carnegie Headingley Stadium, used primarily for cricket and rugby, and the South Leeds Stadium.

A number of other football clubs make use of Leeds’ many football pitches, including Guiseley, Farsley AFC, Yorkshire Amateur, Garforth Town and Leeds Metropolitan Carnegie.

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